The article addresses the tense border dispute between Venezuela and Guyana that has been submitted to the International Court of Justice for adjudication. Aside from the high stakes to be awarded to the recipient of an ICJ decision, the article also examines the process the two countries have accepted to resolve their dispute. It is an example of how LA/C nations defer to international conflict resolution institutions to resolve differences rather than resorting to armed force.
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Dr. Ivelaw Griffith returns to the 2021 Webinar Series to discuss "Conventional and Health Geopolitics in the Contemporary Caribbean" as addressed in his recent publication with the Perry Center. Dr. Griffith is a long-standing expert on Caribbean security, drugs, and crime and a recipient of the 2015 Dr. William J. Perry Award for Excellence in Security and Defense Education.
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This article discusses the conceptual approach to security in the Caribbean, examines the nature of the security landscape in the region, and suggests areas of public security that warrant further attention. In relation to the first issue, it argues that the traditional Realist approach to security, with its focus on the military variable, the state as the unit of analysis, and external threats, is not applicable to the Caribbean region. Rather, an appropriate paradigm is one that goes beyond Realism, taking account of economic and political variables, both state and non-state actors, and external as well as internal threats. In relation the security landscape, it considers the security threats and challenges to include territorial disputes, drugs, political instability, and crime. The work emphasizes that the issue of drugs is not one-dimensional, but involves production, trafficking, abuse, money laundering, corruption, and local and organized crime. Attention is also paid to terrorism, showing the impact of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Caribbean. As regards areas for further attention the article suggests the need for distinctions in use of the terms "national security," "national defense," and "public security." Moreover, it calls for more theoretical and policy oriented work on public security actors and responses, and on crime, private security, and the security implications of HIV/AIDS.
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